The Church of Saint Agnes

1680 Dixie Highway, Fort Wright, KY 41011

The Church of Saint Agnes
1680 Dixie Highway, Fort Wright, KY 41011

Saint Agnes School | Contact Us

28th Week in Ordinary Time

Date: 
Mon, 10/13/2014
Author: 
Rev. Msgr. Donald Enzweiler

When the word of God, preached by Jonah, was heard by the Ninevites,
there was mass conversion.
The people as a whole turned away from sin and evil:
a sign easily detected and observed that God was at work in their midst.
 
Jesus is much greater than Johan and much wiser than Solomon.
When he proclaims the word of God, the conversion of hearts takes place.
People, to this day, when they hear this word, turn away from sin and evil.
A sign that God’s work is ongoing in human history.
 
The greatest sign indicating the power of God’s word
is the conversion of the human heart.
Conversion isn’t a passive experience
where we merely sit back and enjoy the ride.
Conversion is an active process;  it requires our participation.
God shows us a new way, but we must walk the path.
God reveals goodness and truth, but we must choose to make these part of our living.
 
There are certain aspects of our current culture that dehumanize us,
that rob us of a dignified and fulfilled life.
Pope Francis points out some of these dangers to the Christian life
and calls God’s people to conversion away from them.
 
We must be wary of complacency,
of being self-satisfied and unconcerned and smug.
Complacency entails a lack of awareness of actual dangers and deficiencies.
Conversion entails embracing an active concern for our spiritual welfare
and replacing indifference with humble and loving care.
 
We must be wary of a covetous heart
where we have an inordinate desire for material things,
especially things others have and we don’t.
Conversion entails the practice of detachment
and fostering within ourselves a willingness to let go of our possessions.
 
We must be wary of the feverish pursuit of frivolous pleasures.
Conversion entails slowing down, simplifying our life,
and actively pursuing the practice of virtue and service to the needy.
 
We must be wary of a blunted conscience, one that is unformed, dulled, cloudy.
Conversion requires that we seek ongoing understanding about what is truly good
that we sharpen our wits, clarify our motivations,
and that we actively inform our conscience about the teachings of our Church.
 
“O Lord, may the power of your word
convert us more fully to your Son, Jesus Christ. Amen!”