The Church of Saint Agnes

1680 Dixie Highway, Fort Wright, KY 41011

The Church of Saint Agnes
1680 Dixie Highway, Fort Wright, KY 41011

Saint Agnes School | Contact Us

Memorial Saints Basil and Gregory

Date: 
Fri, 01/02/2015
Author: 
Rev. Msgr. Donald Enzweiler

I ate a bowl of Cheerios this morning for breakfast.  My hunger was satisfied.
But to tell you the truth, I don’t remember how they tasted.
I know it happened….at 5:15 a.m. I sat at the kitchen table….paged through yesterday’s paper,
but I don’t even remember putting the Cheerios in my mouth.
It happened yesterday about the same time…..yes, Cheerios….I’m a creature of habit.
But I just don’t remember…..It’s all a blur.
 
I have come to the conclusion….
pieces and sometimes whole segments of our life become blurry….
we can’t recall our sense experience,
what we taste, or see or smell or touch or hear
we can’t recall the thoughts and feelings about circumstances and events
because in the moment, we didn’t take the time to “savor”,
to taste, to enjoy, delight in, to relish….the present.
We’re too busy thinking about something else.
We’re pre-occupied with a multitude of other matters.
We’re there…but we're not there.
 
It would be sad, a loss, a privation in the life of faith
if we were there 8 days ago
as our church and our world celebrated the birth of the Savior
but we weren’t there.
We got through it, no worse for the wear, but do we remember it?
Did we savor it?
Most of us attended Mass that day, received the Eucharist;
can we recall the thoughts, the feelings?
Did we enter into the mystery with hope and expectation?
Did it stir our hearts, renew our belief in God’s concern for our world,
draw us into the power of love and the outpouring of grace?
Or is it all a blur, already forgotten,
irretrievable because it wasn’t impressed upon our spirits and souls…
because we were there…but we weren’t there.
Was our Christmas experience this year perfunctory?
 
It isn’t too late to savor the beauty and the wonder of the Incarnation.
Our daily scripture readings for the next week or so
will continue to draw us back to the meaning and purpose and human reaction
to God’s revelation of love for this world.
The appointed hour has passed but the sounds, smells, the spirit, still linger.
The door that brings us into the presence of God can still be opened.
We can still step through and surrender to that silent night.
 
If we continue life deprived of the truth of Christmas, it is of our own choosing.
At every moment we exist on the edge of mystery.
In every moment can be found the most meaningful human endeavor:
our striving for salvation.